Dropbox wasn’t hacked. Some of their users just dropped the box…

News, Security

A mixed metaphor never hurt anyone, but when you mix your passwords into everything it’s not going to go well.

Password mixing (reusing passwords) is what many believe was the cause of the recent Dropbox account “breach.” Using the same passwords for everything is a huge problem. A chain is only as strong as its weakest link, and with passwords the same applies. The more websites you use a password on, the more likely it is to be leaked in a breach, and unfortunately, the reach and potential for damages from that breach also becomes greater.

Reused Password Graph

It’s not a difficult concept if you consider it for long. If one password is used on five websites, then that password is five times as likely to be leaked, as there are five times as many locations where that password is being stored. At the same time, that password provides access to five times as many websites, which means that there’s potentially greater than five times the amount of information available to the person accessing it than one account would have on its own. The more information they have, the easier it becomes to gain access to other accounts. This appears to be what happened with Dropbox.

Think of it this way, if I gain access to your email, then I can reset the passwords of almost every account tied to that email. What are the chances that your email contains information about your choice of banking institution, online shopping account, or PayPal perhaps?

This wasn’t a breach of Dropbox’s systems; it was a failure of their end-users’ password management skills. When users reuse their passwords across so many websites, they sow the seeds of their own ruin.

For system administrators, the source of this problem is painfully apparent. Quite often, a system administrator will have to remember ten or more passwords just for their day-to-day tasks. Add onto that the 20 or so personal accounts that need passwords and the 30 passwords needed for various lesser-used accounts and systems, and you wind up with an obscene amount of passwords to remember. Now consider every end-user that the system administrator manages. How many passwords do you think those end-users each have?

This is why password reuse is such a problem. There are just too many passwords for anyone to handle!

That’s why you need some sort of solution to the password problem. Now, there’s no need to hire some developer to build you a password management system, you just need a password management solution. Let’s throw one more factor into the mix. If you’re reading this blog, there’s a good chance that you’re already a Kaseya customer. If so, then make sure that the solution you choose supports a Kaseya integration. That way you can accomplish even more from a single pane of glass.

Only Kaseya AuthAnvil solves that problem, allowing organizations to secure their most valuable asset – their data – by minimizing the risk of password-related security breaches. Learn more about AuthAnvil.

Author Harrison Depner

Scare Up New Business: Make Your Customers Afraid of the Dark

The Dark Web is the seamy underbelly of the internet. It is where bad actors lurk and do business withRead More

Bluekeep patch vulnerability

NSA Urges Legacy Windows Users to Patch BlueKeep Vulnerability

The National Security Agency (NSA) has jumped into the fray recently with an advisory urging Microsoft Windows administrators and usersRead More

2019 Connect IT Techie Awards Presentation

Connect IT Global: Day 3 Recap (It’s a Wrap!)

What a conference it’s been! Building on the success of previous Kaseya conferences, this first-ever Connect IT Global was THERead More

Connect IT Lighted Sign

Connect IT Global: Day 2 Recap

For attendees at Connect IT Global, Day 2 was full of opportunities to learn and be excellent across three keyRead More

Connect IT Asia-Pacific - Don't Miss the Premier IT Management Event of the Year - Join Us in Sydney 1-3 October 2019 - Register Now

Archives

Categories